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Artist: Hasegawa Sadanobu I (初代長谷川貞信)

Alternate names:
Gosōtei (go - 五雙亭)
Kinkadō (go - 金花堂)
Konishi (surname - 小西)
Nansō (go - 南窓)
Nansōrō (go - 南窓楼)
Rankō ( as a jōruri singer - 蘭孝)
Ryokyuitsusai (go - 緑一齋)
Sekkaen (go - 雪花園)
Senzō (as the adopted son of Tenki in 1843 - 専蔵)
Shin'ō (go - 信翁)
Shinten'ō (go - 信天翁)
Tokubei (family name - 徳兵衛)
Yūchō (early name - 有長)
Hasegawa Bunkichi (長谷川文喜)

Lifetime: 1809 - 1879

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Biography:

Laurence Roberts noted: "Ukiyo-e printmaker. First a pupil of the Shijō painter Ueda Kōchō. In early 1830s became a pupil of Utagawa Sadamasu. Member of the Ōsaka school. Late in his career designed landscapes, kachōga, and a series of miniature copies of prints by Hiroshige. Also made prints of actors (the first of which appeared in 1834) and bijin."

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Roger Keyes wrote in the Philadelphia Museum of Art catalogue in 1973 on page 238: "Sadanobu I began his career as a pupil of the Shijō painter Ueda Kōchō. In the early 1830s he became a pupil of Utagawa Sadamasu (later Kunimasu), his first actor prints appearing in 1834. By 1840 he was the most active of the Osaka print designers. In 1843, that is, shortly after the Tenpō Reforms, he was adopted briefly into the family of Tenmaya Kihei, the hereditary owner of the publishing firm Tenki. At this time he designed a series of half-length figures of children, which he signed Konishi Sadanobu and Kinkadō Sadanobu, but the association was short-lived; the subsequent year he left the Tenki household. He seems to have had a close and long-standing relationship with the artist Hirosada and may have used some of Hirosada's drawings of actors for prints published around 1850. Later in his career, Sadanobu designed landscapes, bird-and-flower prints, and a series of miniature copies of prints by Hiroshige, which have earned him an undeserved reputation as an unimaginative plagiarist. His descendants carried on his work and the present head of the family, Sadanobu V, may be the last living artist with a direct link to the ukiyoe tradition."